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Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights and California Partnership to End Domestic Violence statement on judge’s decision to uphold the California Values Act

Press release

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: July 6, 2018

Media Contacts:

Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights and California Partnership to End Domestic Violence statement on judge’s decision to uphold the California Values Act

SACRAMENTO — Judge John Mendez yesterday upheld the California Values Act in an order responding to the federal government’s attempt to block the law. Angelica Salas, Executive Director of the California Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights (CHIRLA) and Kathy Moore, Executive Director of the California Partnership to End Domestic Violence issued the following statement:

“In a sea of federal policies harming immigrant communities, the California Values Act is a beacon of hope. Judge Mendez’s decision supports the law we mobilized to pass last year, providing comfort to immigrant victims of domestic violence who seek help.

Domestic violence exists in the shadows and immigrant victims in particular suffer in silence, so we must do all we can to ensure that they feel safe reaching out for help. Increased immigration enforcement efforts have a detrimental impact on victim safety — according to a study released by the National Immigrant Women’s Advocacy Project, 69% of law enforcement officials reported that domestic violence, as experienced by immigrant or limited English proficient victims, was tougher to investigate and prosecute last year in comparison to 2016.

By limiting interaction between the police and Immigration and Customs Enforcement, our state has said yes to public safety and no to endangering families experiencing abuse. In a July 20, 2018 hearing held in Sacramento, Judge Mendez read entire paragraphs from CHIRLA and the Partnership’s amicus brief to defend the California Values Act. His ruling defies the Trump Administration’s abuse of power as it attempted to undermine California’s state rights and expand its nativist agenda at the expense of the large immigrant community.

As an administration that purports to care about the safety of American communities, we believe its practices have produced the opposite effect. Disentangling the two entities is the only way to maintain open lines of communication and trust between immigrant communities and law enforcement.”

About the Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights

CHIRLA is the largest immigrant rights organization in California. Since its inception in 1986, CHIRLA’s vision has been to organize, educate, and mobilize to achieve a society welcoming of all immigrants.

About the California Partnership to End Domestic Violence

The California Partnership to End Domestic Violence (the Partnership) is California’s recognized domestic violence coalition, representing over 1,000 survivors, advocates, organizations and allied individuals across the state. Working at the local, state and national levels for nearly 40 years, the Partnership has a long track record of successfully passing over 200 pieces of legislation on behalf of domestic violence victims and their children. The Partnership believes that by sharing expertise, advocates and legislators can end domestic violence. Through our public policy, communications and capacity building programs, we create system-wide change that supports survivors and invests in prevention. Every day we inspire, inform and connect all those concerned with this issue, because together we’re stronger. With offices in Sacramento, the Partnership’s member programs span the entire state. For more information, visit www.cpedv.org.

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