Skip to main content Skip to site navigation

NEW Blog Series: Confronting Inequities in Our Field

Post

Silence Isn’t Always Golden, written by Dr. Yasi Safinya-Davies
Blog Series: Confronting Inequities in Our Field - July 30, 2020

There have been a few pivotal moments in my life when leaving was me taking back my power. The first time, I was 21 and finally left a violent relationship that started the summer before my junior year in high school. Most recently, I quietly departed from the DV movement. I hadn’t reflected on the significance of my soundless exit until May 26th when I read a CNN article about Amy Cooper, who exercised her white privilege to call the police with a fabricated story of being attacked by a Black man because he had the audacity to ask that she adhere to the Central Park rules and place her dog on a leash.

Post

Intent is Different than Impact, written by Jeanne Spurr
Blog Series: Confronting Inequities in Our Field - July 30, 2020

Intent is different than impact. And both are important.

Working to become a white ally is not a task to be taken lightly. You will be challenged to the very core of your being as you begin to recognize your privilege – the unearned advantages you have in life that our Black, Indigenous and People of Color (BIPOC) friends and colleagues do not have – simply because of the color of your skin. You will have to examine and “unlearn” many closely held beliefs. In the process, your heart will be deeply bruised – healing slowly with forward movement and growth that may take a lifetime.

Post

Uniting My Voice with Others for the Change We Need to See, written by Esther Peralez-Dieckmann
Blog Series: Confronting Inequities in Our Field - July 30, 2020

As the brutality and racism of the murder of George Floyd and countless other Black people over the course of the last year reverberates around the world, I feel an overwhelming sense of remembrance. I feel triggered and greatly saddened because these issues are not new. They feel familiar…the trauma, the anger, the fear, frustration and desperation….all of it. I had put it away in the box that I call “the 70’s” and moved on with my life. Things were crazy back then.

Post

Reflections on Tokenism, written by Constance Athayde
Blog Series: Confronting Inequities in Our Field - July 10, 2020

Tokenism. It is a sneaky perpetuation of inequity facilitated by those enjoying the benefits of privilege. I label it as “sneaky” because it so easily shape-shifts from person-to-person and organization-to-organization. The nods and uhm-hmms are just smoke and mirrors to keep a person, specifically a BIPOC, lost as to what is going on behind closed doors.

Post

Creating an organizational culture that highlights collaboration over competition, written by Alan*
Blog Series: Confronting Inequities in Our Field - July 10, 2020

*The author of this piece chose the pseudonym Alan to protect against retaliation.

I remember standing in an auditorium in Dallas, Texas a few years ago with over 1,000 attendees at an international conference on intimate partner violence. I remember looking around at the predominantly white men and women in suits who proudly placed their hands upon their hearts as they recited the Pledge of Allegiance. “I’m not in California anymore!” I joked to myself as I suppressed every urge I had to run past the walls of suits, the badges, and the elaborate displays of morning pastries and coffee stations – all while an American Idol contestant sang the “Star Spangled Banner” on stage.

Post

To my white colleagues: I can’t give up. You can’t either. Written by May Rico
Blog Series: Confronting Inequities in Our Field - July 10, 2020

To my white colleagues:

I work very hard at being someone I can respect. I treat others the way I want to be treated. I give others the chances I want to be given. I make space for others that I want to be made for me. And when I mess up, and I do a lot, I learn from it and move forward instead of giving up. That’s a person I can respect. That’s who I work to be.

Post

Seeking Participants for the Partnership’s Aspiring White Allyship Group and Its Advisory Committee

Most often, Black, Native & Indigenous, and people of color are speaking up about inequitable policies and practices in organizations. For white folks, sitting back is no longer an option. The Aspiring White Allyship group is developing a project that has come out of the DV field’s inconsistent response to Black people being killed by law enforcement and the failure to respond to the needs of Black, Native & Indigenous, and other staff of color.

If you are an aspiring white ally, we’re seeking your participation in addressing the inequities that staff of color face, while holding yourself accountable to challenge white supremacy within the field. To hold the White Allyship Group accountable, we invite Black women, Native & Indigenous women, Latinas, Asian & Pacific Islander women, and other women of color to participate in the Advisory Committee. We’re looking forward to your participation! Sign up below.

➜ Sign up for the Aspiring White Allyship Group

➜ Sign Up for the Advisory Group 

For more information, please contact Alejandra Aguilar at Alejandra@cpedv.org

Commands