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Teen Dating Violence Awareness & Prevention Month 2020

Overview

Teen Dating Violence Awareness and Prevention Month 2020
Youth in the Lead

Young people in every California community are impacted by teen dating violence. In 2020, we’re lifting up young people’s wisdom and expertise in the work to prevent teen dating violence, promote healthy relationships, heal from trauma, and engage in connected forms of social justice.

Explore our campaign to meet Youth in the Lead Artist Anastasia Senavsky (her amazing work is displayed below!), access shareable social media images with youth quotes, get information about Orange Day on February 11th, and access resources for preventionists. These include a new guide to building bridges with members of statewide coalitions that share common goals of building equity to prevent intimate partner violence—and a Member-exclusive Teen Dating Violence Awareness and Prevention Month Sample Proclamation, updated for 2020!

Meet Youth in the Lead Artist Anastasia Senavsky

I am a seventeen year old high school senior with a passion for design. After volunteering at my local library since September 2018, I was given the opportunity to create my own free art program June 2019 for ages 6-12. Plans and preparation led to the making of “Art with Anastasia”, enabling any kid to learn and enjoy crafting their own artwork. During my Junior year I was a private tutor for the concepts and fundamentals for Art and Design. Throughout this time I have been featured in gallery exhibitions, art award ceremonies and workshops. I have brought art and its importance to the surface of my community while balancing daily life. Along with this, I am the President and Founder of the Art Club at my high school, an avid member of Gender Sexuality Alliance, leading designer in Battle of the Classes, diligent Leo’s Club member, while maintaining my school work. After high school I hope to pursue higher education as a design major, going into an industrial branch. 

➜ The foundation of our campaign is a short survey, in which we seek to learn about youth activism. The input we receive will be shared in social media images throughout our Teen Dating Violence Awareness and Prevention Month campaign.

Survey: Teen Dating Violence Awareness and Prevention Month 2020 – Youth in the Lead

Encuesta: Mes de Concientización sobre la Violencia en las Relaciones de Noviazgo entre Adolescentes 2020 – Jóvenes al poder

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Building Bridges during Teen Dating Violence Awareness and Prevention Month
An Excellent Resource for Partnership Members Who Want to Deepen their Connections with Organizations in their Communities

Download the Building Bridges Guide

If you’re coordinating Teen Dating Violence Awareness and Prevention Month (TDVAPM) in your community, you may have wondered how you can further deepen your partnerships to create even more meaningful youth engagement. Sometimes, an introduction can help! Over the past few years, the Partnership has been building strong relationships with statewide coalitions that share common goals in building equity to prevent intimate partner violence. Connect with the coalitions below to find their local partners, and consider inviting them to your TDVAPM events!

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Shareable Social Media Images – Orange Day
Orange Day is February 11th, 2020! #Orange4Love #CAYouthLead #PreventionAcrossCA

Download Facebook Image | Download Twitter Image

➜ RSVP for Orange Day Events at the Capitol! Rally: 10 a.m., North Steps | 11 a.m., Room TBD: Educational Briefing on the Promise and Impact of Sexual and Domestic Violence Prevention in California

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Passing the Mic to Youth
One young person's story

If you work with youth in your organization, share this story with them and have a discussion. What were some of the healthy and unhealthy behaviors here?

“After 3 years, I came to the realization of the unhealthy tendencies my relationship had picked up over the years. I found my partner had become increasingly dependent: sending texts round the clock and needing to hangout almost everyday. I struggled to find balance, meaning seeing each other became something more to dread than to enjoy. Entering my Junior year of high school I wanted to get involved by undertake more clubs and projects than previous years. During this time I started tutoring on a regular basis, and quickly came to realize how much more dependent my partner had grown. This dependency made me feel as though I had no ability to chase the activities that were important to me. He started to lack his own identity and made me feel guilty for spending time away from him. He lacked the same desires and ambition I had—graduating high school, going to college, having a career. I explained to him the unhealthy issues that were driving me away. I told him that our desires didn’t line up anymore, but he promised to graduate high school if I gave us another chance. He lied about completing make up classes, and ended up not graduating. After that, it was over. The breakup was hard, but we left each other with mutual respect. He finally understood how his actions made me feel, and that our aspirations didn’t line up. We both wanted happiness; we both loved each other deeply, but both of us had different ways of expressing love that eventually grew us apart.”

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Shareable Social Media Images – Economic Justice
Passing the Mic to Youth: #CAYouthLead #PreventionAcrossCA

Economic justice and educational opportunities enhance well-being—and foster healthy relationships with ourselves and others. 

Download Facebook Image | Download Twitter Image

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Shareable Social Media Images – Economic Justice
Passing the Mic to Youth: #CAYouthLead #PreventionAcrossCA

Economic justice and educational opportunities enhance well-being—and foster healthy relationships with ourselves and others. 

Download Facebook Image | Download Twitter Image

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Teen Dating Violence Awareness and Prevention Month Sample Proclamation

Partnership Member Exclusive Resource: Teen Dating Violence Awareness and Prevention Month Sample Proclamation – Updated for 2020.

Interested in becoming a member and gaining access to resources like this? Apply today!

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Promoting Healthy Relationships for Adolescents: Board Policy Considerations
A Joint Publication of CSBA and the California Partnership to End Domestic Violence

Healthy relationship skills developed during adolescence form the foundation for a lifetime of safe and respectful relationships. Unfortunately, adolescent dating abuse is all too common among students and on school grounds. Governing boards play a critical role in ensuring that the schools in their community are safe and supportive learning environments where students are protected from dating abuse and its long-lasting effects on education and health outcomes. This governance brief focuses on efforts to support healthy relationships, prevent adolescent dating abuse,and respond appropriately when dating abuse occurs.

Download the publication. If your organization works with youth, go through the list of recommended measures with them (page 3), and encourage their leadership in having discussions with education policymakers in their community.

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Addressing Bullying and Adolescent Dating Abuse
Supporting Healthy Relationships in Schools

This Partnership policy brief outlines the prevalence of and connection between bullying and adolescent dating abuse—and provides school administrators with considerations, questions, and strategies to guide the process of expanding and strengthening existing policies and encourages comprehensive prevention efforts.

Download the publication—and if your organization works with youth, engage them in the process of advocating for a school policy!

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A CALL TO MEN’s LIVERESPECT™ Curriculum

A CALL TO MEN created the LIVERESPECT™ Curriculum to help coaches, educators and mentors educate and encourage middle and high school boys to examine their attitudes and beliefs about manhood.

Learn more and download the curriculum for free!

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Futures Without Violence’s Changing Minds Campaign

New research shows that witnessing traumatic events, like domestic violence, shootings, or even fighting, can impact the physical development of a child’s brain — potentially leading to lifelong health and social issues. But you can help reverse the effects. The Changing Minds website, developed by Futures Without Violence, will teach you about the science of childhood trauma, and how five everyday gestures can make a world of difference.

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Teaching for Democracy’s Voter Registration Resources

Hosting a voter registration drive is a great way to get students get involved in the electoral process (and perfectly aligns with the Partnership’s Youth in the Lead campaign). Use Teaching for Democracy’s resources to help students learn about the voting rules and registration processes in your state. 

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