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California Partnership to End Domestic Violence Statement on Governor Brown’s state budget proposal

Press release
 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: January 10, 2018
 

Media Contact:
Jessica Merrill, Communications & Development Manager: jessica@cpedv.org | (916) 444-7163, x118

California Partnership to End Domestic Violence Statement on Governor Brown’s state budget proposal

SACRAMENTO — In response to Governor Brown’s draft budget in which we see inadequate funds to address domestic violence in our state, California Partnership to End Domestic Violence Executive Director Kathy Moore issued this statement:

“We appreciate the state’s consistent investment of roughly $20.6 million for domestic violence crisis services over the last 10 years, but it’s simply not enough. When an estimated 5.78 million women and men experience intimate partner violence in California each year[1], lawmakers must see domestic violence for the gross public health crisis it is and respond accordingly.

Today Governor Brown’s proposed budget maintains the status quo, the exact same investment we’ve seen since 2010. During this timeframe, California’s population increased 6%[2]. Even more alarming, hotline calls from domestic violence victims jumped 45% during this same period[3].

The state’s existing allocation has been prudently administered by the California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services to provide a portion of the funds needed for immediate, crisis intervention services at 102 shelters across the state. While these crisis services are critical in saving lives and addressing immediate safety needs, they barely scratch the surface.

If Governor Brown and the California legislature could look through the eyes of domestic violence victims and their children, they would see the long journey to healing far exceeds crisis calls and emergency shelter. On any given day, about half of the 5,410 domestic violence victims being served in California access emergency shelter, while the other half receive non-residential services – things like legal assistance, children’s counseling and other complimentary services[4]. Yet average data also shows there are over 1,086 unmet requests for services every day[5]. Continuing to band-aid these family crises with inadequate resources isn’t the solution. Victims are telling us they need more.

And communities across California need more too. Community leaders see the impact of domestic in their neighborhoods and schools – they see the costs in local healthcare and public safety expenses. As we travel the state, we hear a mounting demand for real prevention efforts. Communities are hungry for resources to tackle the root causes of domestic violence and invest in early-age prevention to create brighter futures for young people and safer California communities. 

The state’s stagnant level of investment doesn’t produce the impact California needs. Considering the prevalence of domestic violence and its’ impact on our state, this budget allocation is not the right-size for the solutions we need. It’s clear that there is much more to be done and now is the time to transform the way we address domestic violence in California.

A recent survey found 80% of Californians from all political perspectives support more government investment to stop domestic violence.[6] We implore Governor Brown and the Legislature to listen to Californians, and increase the state allocation for domestic violence by $25 million.

With the right-sized domestic violence investment, communities all across California will better address victims’ needs, support family stability with flexible housing assistance, pursue effective accountability solutions that balance safety with rehabilitation and healing, and turn the tide with community-based prevention initiatives.”

About the Partnership

The California Partnership to End Domestic Violence (the Partnership) is California’s recognized domestic violence coalition, representing over 1,000 survivors, advocates, organizations and allied individuals across the state. Working at the local, state and national levels for nearly 40 years, the Partnership has a long track record of successfully passing over 200 pieces of legislation on behalf of domestic violence victims and their children. The Partnership believes that by sharing expertise, advocates and legislators can end domestic violence. Through our public policy, communications and capacity building programs, we create system-wide change that supports survivors and invests in prevention. Every day we inspire, inform and connect all those concerned with this issue, because together we’re stronger. With offices in Sacramento, the Partnership’s member programs span the entire state. For more information, visit www.cpedv.org.

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[1] Smith, S.G., Chen, J., Basile, K.C., Gilbert, L.K., Merrick, M.T., Patel, N., Walling, M., & Jain, A. (2017). The National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS): 2010-2012 State Report. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 12-Month Prevalence of Contact Sexual Violence, Physical Violence, and/or Stalking Victimization by an Intimate Partner—California Women; 12-Month Prevalence of Psychological Aggression by an Intimate Partner—California Women; 12-Month Prevalence of Contact Sexual Violence, Physical Violence, and/or Stalking Victimization by an Intimate Partner—California Men; 12-Month Prevalence of Psychological Aggression by an Intimate Partner—California Men. Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/pdf/NISVS-StateReportBook.pdf.

[2] U.S. Census Bureau (2017). QuickFacts: California. Retrieved from https://www.census.gov/quickfacts/CA.

[3] California Office of Emergency Services (2010-2017). Joint Legislative Budget Committee Reports Service Data: FY 10-11 through FY 15-16. Years 2012-2017 retrieved from http://www.caloes.ca.gov/cal-oes-divisions/grants-management/criminal-justice-emergency-management-victim-services-grant-programs/handbooks-reports-publications.

[4] National Network to End Domestic Violence (2013-2017). 2012 Domestic Violence Counts: California Summary, 2013 Domestic Violence Counts: California Summary, 2014 Domestic Violence Counts: California Summary, 2015 Domestic Violence Counts: California Summary, 2016 Domestic Violence Counts: California Summary. Retrieved from https://nnedv.org/mdocs-posts/census_2012_handout_state-summary_ca/, https://nnedv.org/mdocs-posts/census_2013_handout_state-summary_ca/, https://nnedv.org/mdocs-posts/census_2014_handout_state-summary_ca/, https://nnedv.org/mdocs-posts/census_2015_handout_state-summary_ca/, https://nnedv.org/mdocs-posts/census_2016_handout_state-summary_california/

[5] Ibid

[6] Blue Shield of California Foundation (2017). Californians’ Views on Gender, Sexism, and Domestic Violence. 40.

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